Why use online dating services

This is known as the similarity hypothesis, or the “birds of a feather flock together" effect.

EHarmony asks users to fill out extensive psychological questionnaires, many based on established personality scales.

Ok Cupid asks quirkier questions (e.g., “wouldn’t it be fun to chuck it all and live on a sailboat? The idea that we can use reliable tests to identify appropriate partners is certainly seductive (forgive the pun).

In a previous post I summarized statistics showing that online dating is not only prevalent, but also slightly more successful than offline dating in producing stable (i.e., less likely to result in divorce) and satisfying long-term romantic partnerships. There is no definitive research on this question, but we can certainly engage in some informed speculations.

Below, I will present a list of possibilities, and look forward to your thoughts and feedback! Dating companies such as EHarmony and Ok Cupid argue that their proprietary compatibility algorithms enable users to sift through undesirable matches and identify the suitable ones.

On Valentine's Day, some singles may be inspired to step up their dating game. Amy Giberson, now 34, was reluctant to try internet dating again but she decided to give it one more shot in 2014. There are a slew of sites and apps to help singles find love and, for the most part, they work, according to Consumer Reports.

She downloaded the Match app and connected with Justin Pounders, also 34, almost immediately. Nearly half, or 44 percent, of those who tried online dating said it led to a serious long-term relationship or marriage, the magazine found.

A couple of months ago, I was sitting at a bar minding my own business when the woman next to me did something strange.

Surrounded by potential partners, she pulled out her phone, hid it coyly beneath the counter, and opened the online dating app Tinder.

That’s the most interesting result from a Pew Research Center survey released Thursday on Americans’ online-dating habits.

Conducted early last summer, the poll found that use of the services has grown modestly since 2013.

But the fear that online dating is changing us, collectively, that it's creating unhealthy habits and preferences that aren't in our best interests, is being driven more by paranoia than it is by actual facts.

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